.

Photo Samples, South America 2

Paraguay, Chile, Argentina and the Falkland Islands

 

The barren regions of South America, from the Andes to the Patagonia, are some of the most impressive parts of the continent. The middle Andes, in particular Bolivia, is mainly interesting because of it's people and the beauty of the mountains. the further south you go, the lower and wetter are the mountains, and in the Amazon lowlands wildlife may be as impressive as anywhere in Africa - if you're lucky. Lots of work for the photographer. The northern part is found in South America 1, while a separate section has been made for Peru and Bolivia.

As usual, all photos are, of course Claus Qvist Jessen, and none of them are to be used without my permission.

Driest place on earh: The Atacama Desert of northern Chile. During the last 400 years, no rain has fallen yet. Here around San Pedro de Atacama. Claus Qvist Jessen

Salty pond; San Pedro de Atacama, Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

In the dry Atacama, mining is one of the major industries, either for nitrates in the desert or for copper in the open mine of Chuquicamata. This mine is the largest open copper mine in the world, and the trucks used for carrying the ore have the largest tyres ever made. These cars carryy 180-250 tonnes of ore in one load and the mazimum speed is only 7 km/hr; Atacama, Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

The shy and elusive vicuna, the smallest member of the lama family, here from lauca National Park, north Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

"Got a herring?" Hungry male sea-lions in the harbour of Iquique, northern Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

No traffic around the Futalefu border crossing in between Chile and Argentina. Claus Qvist Jessen

With the funny "scales", the houses of Isla Chiloe, southern Chile, are rather typical for the island. Claus Qvist Jessen

No prize for guessing that the main occupation on Isla Chiloe, southern Chile, is concentrated around fishing. These crabs look tasty. Claus Qvist Jessen

Nice-looking 3 pound trout from Isla Chiloe, southern Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

The beautiful Rio Espolon in the southern Chile holds a fair stock of mid-size brown and rainbow trout. Great fun on fly and spin alike.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Patagonia classic in Torres de Paine National Park; Chilean Patagonia. Claus Qvist Jessen

The longest row of moais anywhere on Easter Island: Ahu Tongariki on the eastern part of the island. As all other moais, the look away from the ocean. Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

Moai sunset in Hanga Roa, capital of the Easter Island, Chile.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Seven moais on Ahu Akivi; north-western Easter Island, Chile.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Proud moai on Ahu Anakena, the first ahu to be restored. This was arranged by the famous Norwegian Thor Heyerdahl; northern Easter Island, Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

Moai at the slopes of the Ranu Raraku Crater, the "birthplace" of all the statues of the Easter Island, Chile. Claus Qvist Jessen

Southern right whale. This one is quite young: just a couple of years of age and seven or eight metres long! What a baby! Peninsula Valdez, Argentina. Claus Qvist Jessen

Magellan penguin, Peninsula Valdez, Argentina. Claus Qvist Jessen

The always mist-covered Cerro Torre of Parque Nacional Los Glaciares, Patagonia, southern Argentina. Claus Qvist Jessen

One of the most active and noisy glaciers in the world is the Perito Moreno of Parque Nacional Los Glaciares, Patagonia, southern Argentina. Claus Qvist Jessen

Detail from the Perito Moreno Glacier; Parque Nacional Los Glaciares, Patagonia, southern Argentina. Claus Qvist Jessen

Local man fishing for piranhas in the Rio Paraguay; Concepcion, central Paraguay. Claus Qvist Jessen

Among the Paraguay men, a favourite drink is the "yerba mate", a strange herbal tea digested through a straw; Concepcion, central Paraguay. Claus Qvist Jessen

Garden gnomes; Port Stanley, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Garbage bin with the traditional sheep emblem. The bows in the background are jaw-bones of blue whales; Stanley, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

The traditional occupation of the Falkland Islands is sheep. These days, artificial materials have taken over the role of the English tweed, but still the Falklands posses the largest amount of sheep pro capita - anywhere. Here at the Fitzroy Farm, East Falkland.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Sadly, there are still lots of mines left from the Argentinian invasion in 1981, here 10 kms west of Stanley. Claus Qvist Jessen

King penguin, Volounteer Beach, East Falkland, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Magellan penguins at Gypsy Cove, 5 kms east of Stanley; East Falkland, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

The north coast of the Murrell Peninsula; East Falkland, Falkland Islands. Below, hundreds of rockhopper penguins climb all the way to their nests at the top of the escarpment. Claus Qvist Jessen

Wildlife photography is sometimes very easy! Murrell Peninsula, East Falkland, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Rockhopper penguin feeding its chicken; Murrell Peninsula, East Falkland, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Looks like serious hang-over! The red eyes of the rockhopper penguins make them look very drunk, indeed; Murrell, East Falkland, Falkland Islands. Claus Qvist Jessen

button12.jpg (5359 bytes)

button12.jpg (5359 bytes)