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Photo Samples, Peru and Bolivia

 

The classic Andean countries of Peru and Bolivia are still one of the most interesting and varied parts of the continent - and the world for that matter. From the highland of the Altplano to the humid lowlands of the Amazon, Peru and Bolivia offer the visitor an amazing range of highlights, and it's no coincidence that lots of visitors keep on coming back. The northern part of South America is found in South America 1, while the Patagonian south is found in South America 2

As usual, all photos are, of course Claus Qvist Jessen, and none of them are to be used without my permission.

The landmark of an entire continent: The fantastic Machu Picchu, the one and only Inca city never to be found by the Spaniards; Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Close to the old Inca capital of Cuscu, the impressive and sacred complex of Saqsayhuaman was the site where Manco Inca was inches from beating the Spanish. Central Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Spanish church on Plaza de Armas; Cuzco, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

The old Spanish cathedral of Cuzco, Peru, built upon the even older Inca Temple of the Sun. Claus Qvist Jessen

The famous Calle Loreto of Cuzco, Peru, almost entirely framed by Inca stones. Claus Qvist Jessen

The famous 12-corner stone of Cuzco, Peru. A favoutire tourist thing is to try to sqeeze in the blade of a Swiss army knife in between the finely carved stones. It can't be done! Claus Qvist Jessen

Happy women at the market of Pisac, a few kilometres from Cuzco, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Worried woman, Pisac Market, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Anyone can feel like enjoying an ice-cream. Pisac Market, Peru.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Enjoying a bag of coca leaves; small island in the Peruvian part of Lago Titicaca. Claus Qvist Jessen

Furenal rites, Cabanaconde Village, Colca Region, Peru. The grandmother died eight months ago, however, only now had the family saved enough money to buy a proper cross, and this called for another ceremony. Claus Qvist Jessen

Semi-drunk and very happy woman during the cross raising ceremony; Cabanaconde Village, Colca Region, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Local campesino boy; Cabanaconde Village, Colca Region, Peru.
Claus Qvist Jessen

"Fly on the wings of love". Andes condor taking off; Colca Canyon, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Every morning at 9 am, the condors utilize the up-going winds to gain height in search of dead animals; Colca Canyon, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

The Santa Catalina Monastery, Arequipa, southern Peru. Arequipa is the second city of Peru and much, much more pleasant than Lima. Claus Qvist Jessen

Part of the Santa Catalina Monastery, Arequipa, southern Peru.
 
Claus Qvist Jessen

Ancient sculls taken from the desert graves close to Nazca, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Local Catholic woman worshipping a statue of Guadaloupe (I think!); Nazca, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

Blowing bubbles during the fiesta; Nazca, Peru. Claus Qvist Jessen

The San Lorenzo Church of La Paz, Bolivia. In the alleys behind the church, a daily "witches market" provides anything from magic herbs to lama abortions!. Claus Qvist Jessen

Candles for sale; Catholic shop, La Paz, Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Shy girl; El Alto Market, La Paz, Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Worlds highest ski hut; Chacaltaya, 50 kilometres outside La Paz, Bolivia. The hut is at 5,400 metres, and the lift and slope both starts in 5,600 mtetres. Claus Qvist Jessen

Lago Titicaca, the highest larger lake in the world, from the hills outside Copacabana. In the background lies the famous Isla de Sol where, according to the Quechua, the world has begun; northern Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Fixing the traditional tortora reed boat. It was such a boat, though much bigger, Thor Heyerdahl used for trying to prove his Pacific theories; Lago Titicaca, Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

The inside of the cathedral of Copacabana, including the altar with the famous statue of "La Virgen de Copacabana"; Titicaca, Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

     

Scenes from the Saturday blessing (actually babtism!) of the cars outside the cathedral, Copacabana, Bolivia. Everything is done according to the Catholic rites, and the grey car (Ford Festiva 1996) happens to be my own god-child!! Claus Qvist Jessen

Hello! Lama watching a tourist watching a lama; Parque Nacional Sajama, western Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

On the way down from a failed attempt to climb the 6,400 metre Volcan Parinacota. The one in the background is "only" 6,200 metres; Parque Nacional Sajama, western Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Not much traffic in between Bolivia and Chilean Andes. Long waits are the rule rather than the exception. Claus Qvist Jessen

     

Traditional head gear is the order of the day at the weekly market of Tarabuco, close to the "second capital" of Bolivia: Sucre. Most of the administration has long ago been moved to La Paz, but the supreme court still resides in Sucre. Claus Qvist Jessen

     

More traditional women at Tarabuco, Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Rather untypical, even the Tarabuco men prefer to dress in their traditional dress. The most modern parts are cap and the car tyre sandals; Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Mining carts on the slopes of the famous Cerro Rico, Potosi, southern Bolivian highlands. During the 275 year rule of the Spanish, the silver mines of Cerro Rico were responsible for the deaths of eight million slaves!  Claus Qvist Jessen

In Potosi, dynamite and other explosives are sold openly. The white strings are the fuses; Potosi, south Bolivian highlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Although cocain is illegal, coca leaves are perfectly legal and are sold everywhere in the highlands, here in Potosi. Unfortunately, refining is easy and Bolivia is now the leading exporter of cocain to the western markets. Claus Qvist Jessen

Coca leaves on display; Potosi, south Bolivian highlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Thoughtful campesino woman; Potosi, south Bolivian highlands.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Carrying meat to the colourful butchers market of Potosi; southern Bolivian highlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Even vegetables are for sale, here onions from Potosi, south Bolivian highlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Largest salt lake on earth: Salar de Uyuni in south-western Bolivia. The photo is from Isla de Pescadores in the northern part of the lake. Claus Qvist Jessen

Strange rock formations in southern Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

Salvador Dali couldn't have made this one better; Altiplano, south-western Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

The salty Laguna Colorada, Altiplano, south-western Bolivia. The red colour is due to volcanic activity, and the only wildlife around is flamingoes eating the shrimps of the lake. Claus Qvist Jessen

Hot springs at early morning; Altiplano, south-western Bolivia.
Claus Qvist Jessen

Laguna Verde in the south-western tip of Bolivia. On the other side of the 5,900 metre volcano lies San Pedro de Atacama, Chile.
Claus Qvist Jessen

"What?" Curious lamas outside a local village of the Altiplano, south-western Bolivia. Claus Qvist Jessen

The Bolivian lowlands are a bit drier than one should expect and the main "crop" is cattle. The meat costs less than 2 USD a kilo, and barbecue is a major attraction, here outside a farm, 10 miles from San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Any regional party includes a rodeo competition, and the bull riding is the macho highlight; here in San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Casualties are quite normal, and deaths have occurred. Claus Qvist Jessen

Proud gaucho; rodeo, San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Colourful procession during a regional party, San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

More processions; San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Even female gauchos get tired once in a while; San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Tired campesino girl with an even more tired kitten; San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

In the Third World, the dream of winning in the lottery is ever-present and it already starts at an early age; here from the fiesta at San Borja, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Airfield sunset at Rurrenabaque, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

A rare photo of two different mackaws in Rurrenabaque, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Long-tail boats at the banks of Rio Beni; Rurrenabaque, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Rio Beni vultures waiting to find something dead; Rurrenabaque, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

Local market, Rurrenabaque, Bolivian lowlands. Claus Qvist Jessen

The small and gentle Rio Yacuma, a Rio Beni tributary, is a surprisingly good place to watch wildlife; Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

Further upstream along the Rio Yacuma; Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

Lazy turtle, Rio Yacuma; Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

Take-off! White egret hitting the air; Rio Yacuma, Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

How lazy can you get? A pair of confident capivares in the water of Rio Yacuma, Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

The head of an "Amazon cobra", a very aggressive and poisonous snake of the lowlands; Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

Funny carp caught in another tributary of Rio Beni; Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

A giant piranha caught during a rain storm in a lake in the Rio Beni system; Bolivian Amazon. Claus Qvist Jessen

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