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Photo Samples, Morocco

On the upper left corner of Africa, only a few kilometres away from the southern tip of Europe, Morocco must be one of the most varied countries of the world. The landscapes vary from bitterly cold mountains and fertile valleys to the rugged coast line and the westernmost parts of the dry Sahara. Then add a bunch of colourful people, ranging from the covered Arabs in the north, the hooded Berbers of the central mountains and the freaky Blacks of the south, and the scene is set for a great adventure. Judge by yourself.

As usual, all photos are © Claus Qvist Jessen, and none of them may be used without my permission.

The giant and very recent Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco. The mosque was built in the late 90'ies and is supposed to be the third largest in the world. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Detail from the Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

“Vaulted arc; Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Street scene from Casablanca, Morocco, the economic centre of the country. © Claus Qvist Jessen

To most people, Casablanca is known because of the film, and, yes, there is a Ricks Cafe close to the old Medina. Very posh and very far from local, Bogart has certainly never parked his car here. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Even cars need service; Casablanca, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Cafe scene; the Medina, Casablanca. © Claus Qvist Jessen

     

Morocco is still a very traditional country, dominated by Islam and ancient cultures - and at the same time there is room for modern life. The bearded man to the left is a  taxi driver, while the berber clad woman to the right is checking her sms's on the cell phone. Both Casablanca. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The undisputed centre of Marrakech (and thereby Morocco!) is the fantastic Djema el-Fna. This UNESCO protected square is amazingly alive 24/7, however, the extreme aggressiveness of the touts really sucks. In my opinion, this is the works tourist vultures anywhere on earth. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Water seller making a living from being photographed by tourists; Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Shoes for sale; Marrakech, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Beggar woman at night; Djema el-Fna, Marrakech, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

 

Local police car - an old Renault 4, probably from the mid-70'ies. The photo was taken in 2009! Djema el-Fna, Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Pillows and carpets for sale; Marrakech Medina. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Cutting sweets; Marrakech Medina. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Eggs and potatoes. Very local lunch in the Marrakech Medina. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Brochettes (shashlik) on the grill; Marrakech Medina. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Local butchery focusing on anything but real steaks and fillets. Innards are very popular, it seems! Southern Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The courtyard of the Dar Mnebhi, now the Museum of Marrakech. A visit to this 19th Century palace is highly recommended. © Claus Qvist Jessen

A detail from the Museum of Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Detail from the Saadian Tombs, southern Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Even though Fes is more known than Marrakech with regards to dying leather, the latter's got it's share of tanneries. This gentleman is working in a dye pit in the eastern part of town. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Happy car worker reparing yet another leak in a Toyota; Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Near-vertical bike shop; Marrakech, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Welder in action in the Medina of Marrakech, Morocco. Note the "protection". © Claus Qvist Jessen

Vertical welding; Marrakech, Morocco. As an engineer, I just love people working with metal! © Claus Qvist Jessen

The main "landmark" of Fes in central Morocco is the tanneries. Every day, thousands of hides are dyed, dried or otherwise treated around the ancient dye pits. A worker hardly gets more than 5-8 USD/day, and as the workers expose themselves to loads of poisonous chemicals, the job is far from being healthy - but very good for the photographer. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Dyed sheeps and goats hides; Fes Tanneries. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Having a foot bath in leather dye! Fes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

     

Metal workers; Fes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The courtyard of the ancient Bou Inania Medressa (Medersa) in central Fes. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Detail from the Bou Inania Medressa (Medersa) in central Fes. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Local cooking; the Medina, Fes. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Cleaning the oven. Baker in action, Fes. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Morocco is deservedly famous for it's pottery, here in Fes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Anywhere in the Medina of Fes, you can buy traditinal Berber jewelry. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Part of the Bab el-Mansour, the largest gate in all of Morocco; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The Mausoleum of Moulay Ismail, one of the heroes of Moroccan history; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

One of three fountains outside the Mausoleum of Moulay Ismail; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Inside the Dar Jamaļ Museum; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Fixing a hole in the city wall; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

To be used for a wedding, theses metal gadgets are waiting for the driver to take them away. Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

     

A cigarette pusher and a cake seller, both from the Medina of Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Another metal worker - here from Meknes in central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Elderly man in Berber outfit; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Waiting for work, this elderly painter has probably been sitting here for a few decades; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Believe it or not - they DO have driving schools in Morocco, although it doesn't feel so in the traffic. This one is from Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Colourful olives flanked by marinated lemons; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Bread seller; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Happy butcher; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Sleepy chicken vendor; the Medina, Meknes. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Sewing a dress; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Sewing thread on display; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Painting a door in Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Veils for sale; Meknes, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Via Decumanus Maximus, the main street of Volubilis, the best preserved Roman ruins in Morocco and one of the easy daytrips from Meknes. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The Forum, one of the most impressive buildings in Volubilis, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The Hercules Mosaic; Volubilis, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The Hercules Mosaic; Volubilis, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

One of the most famous floor mosaics of Volubilis is this one, the "Acrobat" showing a man riding backwards on the back of a Donkey. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Road worker in the Atlas Mountains, close to Ouarzazate, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Snake charmer in front of the Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah; Atlas Mountains, Ouarzazate, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah from the river. This kasbah was used as setting for the movie Gladiator, starring Russel Crowe, and traces are still to be found. Ouarzazate, central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

River south of Ouarzazate. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The beginning of the Sahara, south-east of Ouarzazate. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The town of Ouarzazate is frequently used for film making, and, among others, "The Jewel of the Nile" and "Kingdom of Heaven" were made here. This Tibetan palace was used for the Martin Scorsese movie "Kundun". © Claus Qvist Jessen

And this is some coloumns from the Egyptian Palace used during the filming of the Asterix movie, starring Gerard Depardieu. It's all made of papermache. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Tuareg hermit; Sahara, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

     

Kids of the desert; Dades Valley, Ouarzazate, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

"Walking trail" in the Dades Gorge; Central Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Local drummer in action; Merzouga, Sahara, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

After the rain - not a fatamorgana. Mirrir reflections of the camels; Merzouga, Sahara, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The rain rarely falls in the desert, but when it finally happens, floods are almost inevitable. This unfortunate blue van tried to cross a wet wadi and got caught. The tractor had a hard time dragging it free from the mud. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Tired bus passenger; Inezgane, Moroccan coast. © Claus Qvist Jessen

In the south of Morocco, most long distance transport is done by shared taxs; here at Inezgane. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The classic photo of Essaouira, a very photogenic coastal town south of Casablanca. Happily, this town is much less destroyed by tourism than Marrakech. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Essaouira with it's trade mark - the sea gulls. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Fishing boats, Essaouira, south of Casablanca. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Local woman; Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

 

Women on a gun. The term "a broad side" suddenly gets a new meaning; Essaouira Fort. © Claus Qvist Jessen

 

Henna painting; Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Fish cleaning; Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Souvenir shop; Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

One of the most famous visitors of Essaouira was Orson Welles. he made his Othello here, and one of the main sqares is named after him. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Take a break; Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Garlic and other spices; the medina, Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Powder pyramids - all made out of "painted" cardboard, but they look impressive; Essaouira. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Local beach with no tourists; Mirleft, central coast, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

The main "street" of Mirleft, central coast, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Take a stroll! Womans fashion on display in Mirleft, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Friendly elder; Mirleft, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Local worker using his powers; Mirleft, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Cutting the steel; Mirleft, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

Curious woman; Mirleft, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

 

The most traditional of Moroccan dihes is the "tanjine" in which the food is "baked" inside a clay pot. It tastes deliciously! Mirleft, Morocco. © Claus Qvist Jessen

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